Search
Close this search box.

Where to Stay in Athens in 2024 – Best Areas (by a Local)

Whether you're a first-time visitor or a seasoned traveler, find the best place for your stay in Athens.
Where to Stay in Athens - 10 BEST AREAS

Trying to decide where to stay in Athens? As one of Europe’s largest metropolises, Athens offers a diverse array of neighborhoods, each with its unique charm and character.

The city is a fascinating blend of ancient history and modern life, and choosing the right area to stay can significantly enhance your experience.

In this guide, we delve into the best areas in Athens, highlighting their pros and cons based on various travel preferences, budgets, and durations of stay. To simplify your planning, we’ve also included our top picks for hotels, apartments, and AirBnBs in each area.

Best places to stay in Athens

Here’s a quick overview of Athens’ best neighborhoods, with detailed descriptions and accommodation recommendations to follow:

  • Syntagma SquareIdeal for first-time visitors. It’s the heart of Athens, offering easy access to major attractions and excellent public transport connections. The area is vibrant with bars, restaurants, and is close to the Acropolis.
  • Plaka and Anafiotika – Known for its classic charm, this area is perfect for tourists who want to immerse themselves in the picturesque streets of Athens, close to the Acropolis and other major sights. Accommodation here can be pricey.
  • KolonakiBest for a luxurious stay. This upscale neighborhood is known for chic boutiques, fine dining, and stylish bars. It’s within walking distance of many attractions but is more peaceful than other central areas.
  • Monastiraki – A lively area with a blend of historical sites, flea markets, and vibrant nightlife. Ideal for those who want to be in the center of the action.
  • PsiriGreat for nightlife and authentic local experiences. This up-and-coming neighborhood offers a mix of traditional tavernas and modern bars.
  • Koukaki – Best for staying near the Acropolis in a less touristy area. This neighborhood offer a local ambiance and are within walking distance of major attractions.
  • Exarcheia – Suitable for those wanting to live like a local. These areas are more affordable and offer an authentic Athenian experience, though some streets are less polished than others.
  • MetaxourgeioA budget-friendly option, slightly away from the city center but still accessible. It’s a good choice for budget-conscious travelers.
  • PiraeusIdeal for travelers planning to visit the islands, as it’s close to the port. However, it’s farther from the city center and not as ideal for sightseeing in Athens itself.
  • Glyfada – A stylish suburb by the sea, known for its beaches, upscale shopping, dining, and nightlife. It’s a bit further from the historical center but offers a more relaxed and upscale coastal experience, perfect for repeat visitors and families.
Map with the best areas to stay in Athens
Map with the best areas to stay in Athens

1. Syntagma Square, best area to stay in Athens for the first time

Syntagma at night (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
Syntagma at night (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
Nightlife:
4.3/5
Shopping:
4.9/5
Sightseeing:
4.5/5
Safety:
4.8/5
Transportation:
5/5

For me, the crown jewel of accommodation in Athens rests on the majestic brow of Syntagma Square and its surroundings. Plaka might usually get the laurels, and it’s undoubtedly an excellent choice. Still, I believe Syntagma wields the scepter with even more aplomb.

Why, you ask? Well, consider this: Syntagma Square is the beating heart of Athens, a crossroads from which all the city’s vibrant life flows. Its arteries of public transport weave a web across the city, linking every locale and the airport, served by the metro and the budget-friendly X95 bus.

From Syntagma, all the charming neighborhoods are just a hop, skip, and a jump away. Imagine sipping your morning coffee and then strolling to the charming lanes of Plaka in 5-10 minutes, or wandering to the buzzing bars of Monastiraki and Psiri in a relaxed quarter of an hour. 

And if it’s a taste of Athenian elegance you’re after, the upscale neighborhood of Kolonaki sits just next door. The bonus? The entrance to the Acropolis via Plaka, which I’d heartily recommend, is tantalizingly close.

A vibrant tapestry of commerce, Syntagma Square offers a smorgasbord of bars and restaurants, making it an ideal base for exploring Athens’ iconic landmarks. 

It’s a launchpad to diverse nightlife zones, all within a comfortable walk, ensuring your Athenian nights are as captivating as the days. Oh, and let’s not forget – it’s as safe as houses.

  • National Historical Museum: Housed in the old Parliament building, the National Historical Museum weaves tales of Greece’s modern history, showcasing both war memorabilia and traditional folk costumes. A bonus: free entry on Sundays.
  • Tomb of the Unknown Soldier: Before Parliament, watch the evzones, in their iconic attire, change guard every hour. The Sunday 11am parade is particularly captivating, echoing the spirit of the War of Independence.
  • National Garden: Once the royal gardens, this urban oasis offers shade and tranquility. With ponds, a tiny zoo, and a cozy cafe, it’s a refreshing break from the city buzz.
  • Oinoscent: Oinoscent is a delightful blend of ambiance, cuisine, and wine. Their vast cellar boasts over 1,000 wine varieties, both Greek and international. Opt for an outdoor seat and indulge in their Al Limone pasta or Flank Steak, paired with a fine wine selection.
  • Nolan: Nolan is perfect post-shopping at Ermou or for a planned evening out. Their small plates are a treat, especially with seasonal additions by Chef Sotiris Kontizas. Don’t miss the addictive potato bread and Nolan’s fried chicken (NFC) paired with a refreshing drink.
  • Holly Lamma: Holly Lamma challenges vegan stereotypes with offerings like plant-based croissants and grilled cheese. Pastry chef Alexandros Pavlov crafts memorable desserts. For brunch enthusiasts, their vegan English breakfast with tofu scramble is a must-try.
  • 7 Jokers: 7 Jokers is the city’s iconic dive bar, loved by renowned bartenders worldwide. Known for its lively, flirtatious atmosphere, it’s the place to be for quality drinks, great music, and vibrant social interactions.

Best Hotels in Syntagma Square

Hotel Grande Bretagne is one of the “Best Hotels in Europe”
Hotel Grande Bretagne is one of the “Best Hotels in Europe”
  • (€€€) Hotel Grande Bretagne: Grande Bretagne in Athens boasts a prime view of Syntagma Square and the Acropolis. Inside, luxurious rooms and a rooftop restaurant offer unparalleled city sights.
  • (€€) Amalia Hotel: Nestled right by Syntagma Square, offers a comforting blend of modernity and convenience. From its rooms, you can enjoy views of the National Garden and Lycabettus. Personally, I adore its dedication to eco-friendly practices and its proximity to top city sights.
  • (€) Arethusa Hotel: I’ve always had a soft spot for roof gardens, and the panoramic views of the Acropolis from theirs are simply breathtaking.

2. Plaka and Anafiotika, best area to stay in Athens as a tourist

Shopping in Plaka (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
Shopping in Plaka (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
Nightlife:
4/5
Shopping:
4/5
Sightseeing:
4.5/5
Safety:
4.5/5
Transportation:
4/5

Plaka is Athens’ most picturesque neighborhood, a must-visit for anyone new to the city. Located just beneath the Acropolis hill, it’s the heart of old Athens, brimming with souvenir shops, inviting taverns, and quaint cafes, all amidst ancient monuments. If your time in Athens is limited, Plaka is an ideal base.

The charm of Plaka lies in its narrow streets and beautiful neoclassical buildings, giving it a village-like feel in the midst of the city. It’s a pedestrian’s paradise, especially the upper area known as Anafiotika, perfect for leisurely strolls.

Easily accessible from both the Syntagma and Acropolis metro stations, Plaka offers a variety of accommodations. Whether you’re looking for luxurious boutique hotels or budget-friendly hostels, you’ll find it here in Plaka.

Plaka isn’t just about charming streets; it’s a historical treasure with over three thousand years of history, home to numerous museums and archaeological sites. The neighborhood’s unique atmosphere sets it apart from other areas in Athens.

  • Museum of Greek Folk Musical Instruments: Operating since 1991, showcasing the collection of musicologist Foivos Anogiannakis.
  • Frissiras Museum: Opened in 2000, featuring contemporary European art.
  • Jewish Museum: Exhibiting a collection of rare books, textiles, domestic, and religious artifacts.
  • Athens University Museum: Displaying many transcripts and old photos.
  • Museum of Pavlos and Alexandra Kanellopoulou: Housing archaeological finds and artworks from the prehistoric period to the present.
  • Benizelos Mansion: The oldest house in Athens, now functioning as a museum.
  • Children’s Museum: Offers art created by children and activities like dress-up.
  • Roman Agora: An archaeological site with structures such as the Fethiye Mosque, the Agoranomion, and the Tower of the Winds.
  • Tower of the Winds: A 12-meter-tall clocktower considered the first meteorological station.
  • Choragic Monument of Lysikrates: A monument built by Lysikrates to commemorate a theatrical victory in 335/334 BC, with historical significance related to Lord Byron and the introduction of tomatoes to Greece.

For a unique experience, visit Yiasemi in Anafiotika, a delightful café-bistro ideal for afternoon coffee, with outdoor seating on stairsteps. Don’t miss Brettos, the most enchanting bar in Plaka, located on Kydathinaion street. Formerly the oldest distillery in Athens, now a bar with a stunning display of colorful liquor bottles.

  • Filomouson Etairias Square: Numerous cafes with views, offering coffee and drinks.
  • Saita Taverna: Known for good quality food.
  • Vyzantino Restaurant : Offers traditional Greek cuisine.
  • I Palia Taverna tou Psarra: A notable dining spot.
  • To Kafeneio: Cozy ambiance, especially in winter with a fireplace.
  • Scholarhio Ouzeri: Also known as Kouklis, popular among locals.
  • Café Melina: Dedicated to Melina Merkouri, offering a unique atmosphere.

Best Hotels in Plaka

  • (€€€) AthensWas Design Hotel: AthensWas, set on Athens’ scenic Dionysiou Areopagitou, faces the Acropolis and is minutes from key sites and the metro. It blends modernist design with luxury amenities, including a rooftop Greek cuisine restaurant.
  • (€€) Ergon House: Ergon House in Athens, a 4-star hotel just 500m from Monastiraki Square, offers a unique stay with a fitness centre, private parking, and on-site dining options.
  • (€) Adam’s Hotel Adam’s Hotel is an ideal and budget friendly base for exploring Athens. Some rooms are enjoying Acropolis views.

3. Kolonaki, best area in Athens for a luxurious stay

My favorite cafe in Kolonaki (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
My favorite cafe in Kolonaki (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
Nightlife:
4.5/5
Shopping:
4.7/5
Sightseeing:
3.5/5
Safety:
4.7/5
Transportation:
3.5/5

Kolonaki is Athens’ most aristocratic neighborhood, nestled between the National Garden and Lycabettus Hill, the city’s highest point. It’s conveniently close to the Parliament and Syntagma Square, making it a prime location for those interested in politics and business.

This area is renowned for its upscale boutiques, sophisticated bars, gourmet restaurants, and art galleries. It’s an ideal spot for shopping, enjoying fine dining, or exploring art.

A unique feature of Kolonaki is the opportunity to ascend Lycabettus Hill, either on foot or by funicular, offering stunning views of Athens. The neighborhood also houses notable museums like the Museum of Cycladic Art and the Byzantine Museum.

For those willing to invest a bit more in their stay, Kolonaki offers luxurious accommodations. While the area is known for its high-end hotels, early booking might reveal some reasonably priced rental apartments.

Best Hotels in Kolonaki

  • (€€€) Athens Capital Center Hotel – MGallery Collection: Besides the luxurious rooms you can enjoy dining at ‘MFlavours’ restaurant, drinks at Gallerie Café, and city views from the ‘Mappemonde’ lounge pool bar.
  • (€€€) Academias Hotel, Autograph Collection: This 5-star hotel merges luxury with practicality, featuring chic, quiet, well-equipped rooms. It also boasts a well-stocked lobby bar, a rooftop bar with stunning Acropolis views, and is conveniently located within a 10-minute walk from central attractions.
  • (€€) COCO-MAT Athens Jumelle: A beautifully minimalistic space, offering a delightful breakfast and spotless rooms. The indoor pool and hammam are impeccably clean, ensuring a relaxing and comfortable stay.

4. Monastiraki

Monastiraki square
Monastiraki square
Nightlife:
4.5/5
Shopping:
4.7/5
Sightseeing:
4.2/5
Safety:
3.5/5
Transportation:
4.5/5

Monastiraki is a vibrant hub in Athens, serving as a lively counterpart to Syntagma’s central role. The area is teeming with tourists and offers a rich mix of shops, flea markets, eateries, and outdoor dining terraces, making it an ideal spot for those who want to experience the city’s energy up close.

Staying in Monastiraki places you at the heart of Athens, within easy reach of major attractions like Syntagma Square and the Acropolis, as well as the lively bars of Psiri and Gazi’s nightlife.

However, the area’s vibrancy comes with its challenges, including potential noise and crowds. Those considering a hotel in Monastiraki should carefully read reviews, particularly if a quieter environment is preferred.

  • Tzistarakis Mosque: A historic mosque built in 1759, now serving as a museum of handicrafts with a remarkable collection of pottery.
  • Hadrian’s Library: Constructed in 132 AD by Emperor Hadrian, this ancient library marks an important part of Athens’ historic infrastructure.
  • The small church of Pantanassa: A remnant of Byzantine times, now a popular spot for people to rest and observe the bustling square.
  • Flea Market on Hephaestus Street: The heart of Monastiraki’s shopping scene, offering everything from clothes to antiques, popular with both locals and tourists.
  • Abyssinia Square: Known for its antique shops and furniture stores, and a tavern that’s popular for its traditional delicacies and live gypsy band performances.
  • Museum of Greek Folk Musical Instruments: Housing around 600 Greek musical instruments exhibited over the last 300 years, located at the Lassani Mansion.
  • Temple of Hephaestus in Ancient Agora: One of the most perfectly preserved ancient temples in Greece, dedicated to Hephaestus and Ergani Athena.
  • Roman Agora and Tower of the Winds: A significant historical site featuring the world’s first meteorological station and the 8 Wind Gods engraved around its structure.
  • Gate of Athena Archegetis: A monumental entrance with grand columns, connecting the Ancient Agora with the Roman, often accompanied by live musicians.
  • Six Dogs: A famous local spot known for its inner courtyard that offers a relaxing environment reminiscent of a mountain village square.
  • Couleur Locale: A bar located on an urban-style terrace in the center of Athens, offering magnificent views of the Acropolis while guests enjoy coffee and cocktails.
  • Dioscuri: Situated on the pedestrian street of ancient Adrianou street, it offers coffee with views of the Ancient Agora and the Holy Rock of the Acropolis.
  • Vryssaki: A lively and artistic café where people meet to create and be inspired, with options to enjoy coffee on a terrace overlooking the Acropolis or in a cozy interior.
  • Kallipateira Tavern: One of the oldest dining places in Monastiraki, located in a historic neoclassical building with a welcoming atmosphere and homemade traditional Greek food.
  • Karamanlidika: Offers a taste of Anatolia and Byzantine cuisine, famous for its traditional “prosfournia”, cheeses from small Greek producers, homemade “soutzouki”, and “pastourma”.
  • Zillers: A terrace restaurant next to the Metropoles church, known for its breathtaking view of the Acropolis, especially at night, and modern, elegant dishes.
  • Cosa Nostra: An eatery with an atmosphere reminiscent of “The Godfather” movie or New York’s Little Italy, offering authentic Italian recipes in a vintage setting.

Best Hotels in Monastiraki

5. Psiri, best area to stay in Athens for nightlife

Iroon Square
Iroon Square
Nightlife:
5/5
Shopping:
4/5
Sightseeing:
3.8/5
Safety:
3.9/5
Transportation:
4.5/5

Nestled between Monastiraki and Omonia Square lies Psiri, a neighborhood whose grit and graffiti may give pause at first glance.

It lacks the polish of Kolonaki and the timeless beauty of Plaka, but Psiri shines in its own right, brimming with authenticity and vibrant local life. For someone like me, looking for a mix of convenience, a dynamic dining scene, and lively nightlife, Psiri is an intriguing option.

Despite its appearance of being worn and graffiti-covered, I see Psiri as a safe and emerging area, its charm magnified by its easy access to Athens’ top sights.

The streets are lined with traditional tavernas and restaurants, some bustling with tourists, others hidden gems known mostly to locals, all offering a feast of flavors and music that’s a delight to any food enthusiast.

At night, Psiri comes alive in a different light, hosting a mix of beautifully decorated bars and terraces ideal for enjoying Athens’ nightlife.

To really soak in what Psiri has to offer, I wander down Karaiskaki street or explore Karytsi Square and its lively surroundings, catching the infectious energy of the place.

Best Hotels in Psiri

6. Koukaki, best area to stay in Athens near Acropolis

The charming neighborhood of Koukaki (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
The charming neighborhood of Koukaki (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
Nightlife:
4.5/5
Shopping:
4/5
Sightseeing:
4.5/5
Safety:
4.2/5
Transportation:
4.5/5

As a resident of Koukaki for the past six months, I’ve come to appreciate this neighborhood’s vibrant yet peaceful atmosphere. It’s a delightful mix of residential and modern urban life, nestled between Filopappou Hill and Syngrou Avenue.

This area offers an authentic local experience, with charming bakeries, ice cream parlors, and wine bars. A notable attraction is the EMST (Museum of Contemporary Art), housed in the historic FIX brewery. It’s a must-visit for art enthusiasts, showcasing Greek contemporary art and international collaborations.

Koukaki’s pedestrian streets, Drakou and Olympiou, are perfect for leisurely strolls. For dining, consider Lalos Tavern for traditional fare or Park Bench for creative cuisine. For a casual treat, Django’s ice cream is a delight. Coffee lovers should try Laluk or Neratzia, and for a memorable evening, the Tiki Bar offers classic cocktails.

In terms of accommodation, Koukaki provides a good mix of rental apartments and hotels, suitable for various budgets and preferences.

View of Acropolis from Herodion Hotel (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
View of Acropolis from Herodion Hotel (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)

Best Hotels in Koukaki

7. Exarcheia, best area in Athens to live as a local

Typical street in Exarcheia Neighborhood
Typical street in Exarcheia Neighborhood (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
Nightlife:
4.5/5
Shopping:
3.5/5
Sightseeing:
3.5/5
Safety:
3.5/5
Transportation:
4/5

Exarcheia, nestled near bustling Omonoia Square, is a unique blend of history and bohemian charm. Known for its role in the Polytechnic Uprising of 1973, this neighborhood offers an alternative flair and a vibrant cultural scene.

The area is a hub for an eclectic mix of cafes, bars, art galleries, indie theaters, and bookstores, reflecting its creative and diverse spirit. Despite its modern cafe culture, Exarcheia maintains its strong, distinctive personality.

A highlight for visitors is the Saturday fruit and vegetable market on Kallidromiou Street. It’s more than just a place for fresh produce; it’s an opportunity to immerse yourself in local life.

In terms of accommodations, Exarcheia offers a variety of affordable options, including mid-range hotels and rental apartments, catering to both short-term and long-term stays.

  • National Archaeological Museum: This museum is one of the best in Athens and houses the largest collection of ancient Greek artifacts in the world.
  • Epigraphic Museum: Located in the right wing of the National Archaeological Museum, this museum is dedicated to inscriptions and epigraphs from ancient Greece.

For food enthusiasts, Exarcheia is a treasure trove. Don’t miss the street food at Black Salami, a local favorite. For a sit-down meal, Rakoumel offers delightful Cretan cuisine, and Ama Lachei provides a relaxing courtyard dining experience on one of Athens’ most characteristic streets.

For a relaxed evening drink, head to Enikos on Kallidromiou Street. This early ’90s classic bar is perfect for conversations, with its subtle music and walls adorned with artistic prints and photographs.

If you’re in the mood for something edgier, Santarosa offers a unique experience with its excellent Negroni, diverse music curated by sophisticated DJs, and a distinctive social media presence. It’s the ideal spot for those who appreciate a mix of ambient electro, B movie soundtracks, and spiritual jazz.

Best Hotels in Exarcheia

8. Metaxourgeio, Budget-friendly Accommodation in Athens

Paramithias street in Metaxourgeio
Paramithias street in Metaxourgeio (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
Nightlife:
4/5
Shopping:
3/5
Sightseeing:
3/5
Safety:
3/5
Transportation:
4/5

Metaxourgeio serves up a viable and relatively central option for those seeking cheap accommodation in Athens. While it may not rank among the city’s prime areas, it fares better than Omonia and carries a higher safety rating. With appropriate precautions after dark, Metaxourgeio deserves consideration for budget-conscious travelers.

When you compare the prices, you’ll find that it’s possible to snag 4-star hotels cheaper than 3-star establishments in Plaka. Furthermore, there’s an assortment of affordable, decent hotels. Having a hotel near the metro station is definitely a bonus.

However, given a choice between Omonia and Metaxourgeio, I would lean towards Omonia. The two are just a short walk away from each other, but for its location and metro proximity, Omonia appears more convenient.

Best Hotels in Metaxourgeio

9. Piraeus, best area to stay in Athens if you're visiting the greek islands

A ferry departs from the bustling Piraeus Port while i was on my way to Agistri island (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
A ferry departs from the bustling Piraeus Port while i was on my way to Agistri island (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
Nightlife:
3/5
Shopping:
3/5
Sightseeing:
3/5
Safety:
4/5
Transportation:
4/5

Interestingly, Piraeus Port offers a substantial range of hotels.

However, apart from the convenience of catching an early ferry to the islands, I find little allure in staying here.

It’s a residential area with three ports – one for passengers and cargo, one for yachts, and Mikrolimano, the quaint fishing port perfect for indulging in fresh seafood. 

Personally, I wouldn’t recommend this area for a stay in Athens. It’s too far-flung, even with the new metro station (Dimotiko Theatro) opened to the public earlier this year.

Best Hotels in Piraeus

Beyond the popular accommodation areas, there are some noteworthy alternatives. Areas like Ilisia (adjacent to Kolonaki), or Thisio and Kerameikos (close to Monastiraki) are not in the absolute center, yet they are well-connected by metro or are quite close. A slight drift away from the center could result in considerable savings, as long as you’re near a metro station.

Furthermore, if you’re out late, beyond metro operation hours, a taxi ride back won’t break the bank, as Athens taxis are quite affordable.

10. Glyfada, best area to stay in Athens near beach in summer

Glyfada Marina
Glyfada Marina
Nightlife:
3.5/5
Shopping:
4/5
Sightseeing:
2.5/5
Safety:
5/5
Transportation:
3/5

For the summer months, consider the coastal districts of the city, such as Glyfada. This area comes alive in the summer, presenting an array of chic shops, quality restaurants, bars, and a plethora of both day and nighttime entertainment.

Much of the nightlife gravitates to these areas during the summer months. Many downtown clubs open their franchises here. The only drawback is the substantial commute to the city center.

Glyfada might not be the most recommended spot for first-time visitors to the Greek capital, but for repeat visitors visiting in the summer and seeking a different side of the city with a vibrant summer scene, it’s a worthwhile consideration for a stay in Athens. 

Glyfada offers a range of family-friendly hotels and accommodations, making it a suitable choice for families visiting Athens.

Best Hotels in Glyfada

The Acropolis Museum (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)
The Acropolis Museum (photo: Pantelis Kakaris)

FAQ

Athens is a wonderfully family-friendly city, teeming with child-appropriate attractions that blend fun with education. Here are some of my favorites:

  • The Acropolis Museum is a hit with its interactive exhibits and educational activities that bring the Acropolis’ history to life.
  • The Acropolis site itself is a bit of a climb, but it’s worth it. Kids love exploring and imagining ancient Greece here.
  • For a more laid-back experience, the National Gardens are perfect. It’s a green oasis where kids can spot ducks in the pond and enjoy some playtime.
  • The Eugenides Planetarium is fantastic for educational shows about stars and planets – a must-visit for curious young minds.
  • Attica Park is great for kids of all ages, offering a variety of games and attractions.
  • The Stavros Niarchos Foundation Cultural Center is another gem, with diverse spaces and activities for children.
  • And don’t forget the Athens Riviera! Its beaches are ideal for family relaxation and fun.

When it comes to neighborhoods, most of Athens is quite family-friendly. I’d probably steer clear of Exarcheia due to frequent demonstrations, and Psirri and Gazi for their bustling nightlife.

For families with young children, Plaka is fantastic with its pedestrian streets. Thiseio is another great choice, offering green spaces and pedestrian areas. And for beach lovers, Palaio Faliro is perfect, with its beachfront and parks, including the one at the Stavros Niarchos Center.

Kolonaki, Koukaki, and Pagkrati are also good options, though they can be a bit tricky to navigate with kids due to traffic. Glyfada is equally family-friendly, albeit a bit farther from the city center.

Despite Athens’ status as a major tourist hub, the availability of hotels in its central areas is somewhat limited, given the demand.

The city center is quite compact, and what you’ll typically find are relatively small hotels. These properties are highly sought after and often book up fast.

Moreover, prices in the city center are considerably steeper compared to areas a bit further out. Venturing two or three metro stops away from the city center, you’ll find that hotel prices drop significantly. This small trade-off can be worth it when staying in Athens, as it can help you save a substantial sum.

To give you an idea of what a hotel room in Athens costs, a double room per night in a decent three-star hotel in one of the central districts will set you back from around 60 euros a night.

If you book several months in advance and during the winter months, you can find deals in these same hotels for around 40 euros. However, be aware that during periods of high tourist influx, these prices can increase significantly.

Ideal visits to Athens are served best during the spring or the first blush of autumn when temperatures are as mild as a sip of local ouzo. However, the European summer holidays coincide with peak tourist influx in Athens, adding a lively vibe to the city.

Fear not, though, Athens is like an open-air taverna, always making room for more. A few districts, just a stone’s throw from the city center, or even within walking distance to the Acropolis, offer accommodation as tantalizing as a well-aged feta.

Just by straying a bit off the beaten path, or moving two or three metro stops away, you might find yourself ensconced in a four or even five-star luxury for the price of a three-star hub in the city center.

8 Responses

  1. Hi dear
    I want to know about an area that is called Khaydari or haydari near Athens.do you know about it.
    I will be glad to hear from you

    1. It’s not an area you want to stay if you want to explore Athens. Especially if it’s your first time in the city. It’s far away from the center and most Athen’s attractions. You better follow my neighborhood recommendations on the guide above.

  2. Hello, i moved to Greece few days ago, cause of work. Im still at an hotel in piraeus. Where would you recommend to rent a flat in Athens? I want to be more in the city, cause piraeus seems very off. Im 21 yo.
    I will be glad to hear from you!

    1. Although this guide is for visitors of Athens and not for people who want to actually live in for longer periods, I would suggest looking for appartments in Pagkrati, Kyspeli, Koukaki, Petralona, Ilisia areas to enjoy living in the center of Athens as a local would do. Depending on the neighborhood you choose, you’ll find rents in the 500-1000 € range. Welcome to Greece and I wish you good luck 🙂

  3. Hi Pantelis,
    I want to leave for Athens in summer for a week with children, what area would you recommend? A good hotel with affordable price 🙂 thank you!

  4. Hello,

    We going to visit Athen with my girlfriend in may. We booked, an accommodation for four days in Exarcheia district, near to Statue of Athena in the big Park. After we booked we read it’s not the best neighborhood. Is it safe? Or should we change the booking? It’s going to be our first visit in Athens, and I don’t want to ruin our trip, if we afraid to go home.. Thank you for your help!

    1. Hey 🙂

      It’s not the best neighborhood indeed BUT if you can afford to use taxis for your night outs you’re gonna be fine It’s about 5-7 euros per ride if you stay in the center. On the other hand, if you have free cancellation on your booking, I would def go for it. You can still find a place in Exarcheia and feel safe though. From Kolonaki area up to Benaki Str is totally safe and vibrant.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

* Some links above may be affiliate links. At no extra cost to you, I earn a commission on purchases made through these links. I only endorse products and companies I personally use. This helps keep Adventourely community-supported and ad-free.